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How do isohronic tones work?


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#1 SanMarko

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 07:11 PM

I'm trying to find information on Internet how exactly do isohronic tones work. Since hearing range of humans is 20-20,000 Hz. But some seasons in neuro-proggramers have frequency's below 10 Hz. How can brain be entrained with isohronic tones thah have frequencys below 20 Hz, if humans can't hear this. I know how the trick works with bineural bits, but whats the trick behind isohronic tones?

Thanks for you answers.

#2 CraigT

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 08:27 PM

Hi,

Isochronic beats work the same as any percussion instrument - by delivering modulated pulses of an audible frequency. Repetitive drumming has long been a source of altered states.

The default pitch used in MWS and NP3 is 180Hz, clearly within the range of human hearing. This is modulated by the beat frequency required, so a 10Hz stimulation will consist of ten 180Hz pulses per second.

Thus we have the important distinction between the Beat or Entrainment frequency and the Pitch of the audible tone which carries it.

This can get interesting with low carrier frequencies (pitch) and high entrainment frequencies (beat). With a pitch in the low audible range, depending on the low frequency performance of the headphones, the pitch itself becomes a beat to which the brain can respond. Gamma can thus be stimulated with a simple, unmodulated pitch of 20-50Hz. A 10Hz beat on a 40Hz pitch is effectively alpha + gamma stimulation.

You'll find more detail here... http://craigtavs.wor...ches-and-tones/ and here... http://craigtavs.wor...-quick-summary/

Cheers,
Craig

Edited by CraigT, 17 February 2012 - 08:35 PM.


#3 SanMarko

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 10:30 PM

Thanks Craig,

your page helped me to somewhat understand it. :)



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